I hope Fletch doesn't get too comfy on ESPN

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I hope Fletch doesn't get too comfy on ESPN

Postby burgngold4life » Thu Jan 17, 2013 2:39 pm

I really hope he doesn't. lol I just saw him on SportsCenter.

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Postby Hooligan » Thu Jan 17, 2013 3:15 pm

I just saw that and I was thinking the same thing!

I hope that when he decides to hang up the cleats that he becomes a coach for us, not a TV analyst. Having a guy like that around your players is invaluable. Pay the man and keep him.
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Postby DaSkinz Baby » Fri Jan 18, 2013 12:45 pm

May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???

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Postby jmooney » Fri Jan 18, 2013 2:59 pm

DaSkinz Baby wrote:May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???


he's the Peyton Manning of defense

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Postby HTTRRG3ALMO » Fri Jan 18, 2013 5:22 pm

DaSkinz Baby wrote:May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???


I'm curious as to how he would be as a coach personally. Can't help but wonder if they staff has been "evaluating" him for such a role. I'd love to see him somehow stay with the franchise but again, how knows how/if he would fit.

Gotta love the guy either way.

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Postby Deadskins » Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:33 pm

DaSkinz Baby wrote:May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???

Because he is already a coach on the field.
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Postby Hooligan » Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:28 pm

Deadskins wrote:
DaSkinz Baby wrote:May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???

Because he is already a coach on the field.


This.

He knows what's going on and where to line everyone up, plus where to make adjustments. Didn't he also run the defensive workouts during the lockout? He's got everything but a whistle around his neck.
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Postby TimSkin » Sat Jan 19, 2013 8:55 am

Hooligan wrote:
Deadskins wrote:
DaSkinz Baby wrote:May I play devils advocate and ask why would you think he would make a good coach? Perhaps he isn't coach material. I mean I don't know either way but just because your a good player doesn't always translate into a good coach. I know many smart people that would not make good teachers and in essence isn't a coach a type of teacher???

Because he is already a coach on the field.


This.

He knows what's going on and where to line everyone up, plus where to make adjustments. Didn't he also run the defensive workouts during the lockout? He's got everything but a whistle around his neck.


Agreed and when Fletch does make a rare mistake or is caught out of position you notice that this doesn't happen again and he can adjust on the fly very well which is very important as a Coordinator.
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Postby emoses14 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:32 am

My only concern for Fletch as a coach would be the superstar problem. Whether fletch is a hall of famer or not, i don't think there is a lot of debate about whether he was/is an extremely talented singularly focused bad bad man on the field. Often throughout history, we've seen that it is the also ran journeymen (not a disparaging comment, but think like Reed Doughty) that make the best coaches when their playing days are over. Typically, I think people wrongly associate this with the fact that journeymen have to be "smart" or "truly understand the game" in a way that a superstar doesn't in order to succeed. And it is that quality that makes them a decent coach. The superstar, this theory goes, is so talented that they rely on their talent and don't fully appreciate the nuances of the game.

My theory on why Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary did not and why a guy like Fletch MIGHT not, is that the superstar isn't a bad coach because they don't understand the game, it is that they in fact clearly do understand the game on a level that most other can't, AND that is the problem. Trying to teach someone who is not as talented gifted driven as you are the way you think things ought to be done is far more difficult for a superstar than a journeyman because of their perspective.

Long story short (too late, I know), is that I think Fletcher is a unique combo of superstar and journeyman who could successfully make the transition, but I have a 25% reservation about his going the way of other highly talented superstar players that have a hard time understanding how someone can't do things the way they did it.
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Postby ACW » Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:16 pm

emoses14 wrote:My only concern for Fletch as a coach would be the superstar problem. Whether fletch is a hall of famer or not, i don't think there is a lot of debate about whether he was/is an extremely talented singularly focused bad bad man on the field. Often throughout history, we've seen that it is the also ran journeymen (not a disparaging comment, but think like Reed Doughty) that make the best coaches when their playing days are over. Typically, I think people wrongly associate this with the fact that journeymen have to be "smart" or "truly understand the game" in a way that a superstar doesn't in order to succeed. And it is that quality that makes them a decent coach. The superstar, this theory goes, is so talented that they rely on their talent and don't fully appreciate the nuances of the game.

My theory on why Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary did not and why a guy like Fletch MIGHT not, is that the superstar isn't a bad coach because they don't understand the game, it is that they in fact clearly do understand the game on a level that most other can't, AND that is the problem. Trying to teach someone who is not as talented gifted driven as you are the way you think things ought to be done is far more difficult for a superstar than a journeyman because of their perspective.

Long story short (too late, I know), is that I think Fletcher is a unique combo of superstar and journeyman who could successfully make the transition, but I have a 25% reservation about his going the way of other highly talented superstar players that have a hard time understanding how someone can't do things the way they did it.
So you mean like a superstar like Peyton or Ray Lewis might be TOO smart to be a coach?
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Postby Countertrey » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:58 pm

ACW wrote:
emoses14 wrote:My only concern for Fletch as a coach would be the superstar problem. Whether fletch is a hall of famer or not, i don't think there is a lot of debate about whether he was/is an extremely talented singularly focused bad bad man on the field. Often throughout history, we've seen that it is the also ran journeymen (not a disparaging comment, but think like Reed Doughty) that make the best coaches when their playing days are over. Typically, I think people wrongly associate this with the fact that journeymen have to be "smart" or "truly understand the game" in a way that a superstar doesn't in order to succeed. And it is that quality that makes them a decent coach. The superstar, this theory goes, is so talented that they rely on their talent and don't fully appreciate the nuances of the game.

My theory on why Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary did not and why a guy like Fletch MIGHT not, is that the superstar isn't a bad coach because they don't understand the game, it is that they in fact clearly do understand the game on a level that most other can't, AND that is the problem. Trying to teach someone who is not as talented gifted driven as you are the way you think things ought to be done is far more difficult for a superstar than a journeyman because of their perspective.

Long story short (too late, I know), is that I think Fletcher is a unique combo of superstar and journeyman who could successfully make the transition, but I have a 25% reservation about his going the way of other highly talented superstar players that have a hard time understanding how someone can't do things the way they did it.
So you mean like a superstar like Peyton or Ray Lewis might be TOO smart to be a coach?
I found myself scratching my head a bit, as well...
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Postby emoses14 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 7:07 pm

No. Not too smart. Too easily frustrated that their players are not performing with the same drive intelligence heart effort or effectiveness as they did when they themselves were players . Their expectations of others' performance st their direction would be too high for damn near anyone else to meet. ANC yes I think pey-pey and stanbby mcstabby would absolutely have this problem.
I know he got a pretty good zip on the ball. He has a quick release. . . once I seen a coupla' throws, I was just like 'Yeah, he's that dude.'"

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Postby TimSkin » Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:54 pm

emoses14 wrote:My only concern for Fletch as a coach would be the superstar problem. Whether fletch is a hall of famer or not, i don't think there is a lot of debate about whether he was/is an extremely talented singularly focused bad bad man on the field. Often throughout history, we've seen that it is the also ran journeymen (not a disparaging comment, but think like Reed Doughty) that make the best coaches when their playing days are over. Typically, I think people wrongly associate this with the fact that journeymen have to be "smart" or "truly understand the game" in a way that a superstar doesn't in order to succeed. And it is that quality that makes them a decent coach. The superstar, this theory goes, is so talented that they rely on their talent and don't fully appreciate the nuances of the game.

My theory on why Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary did not and why a guy like Fletch MIGHT not, is that the superstar isn't a bad coach because they don't understand the game, it is that they in fact clearly do understand the game on a level that most other can't, AND that is the problem. Trying to teach someone who is not as talented gifted driven as you are the way you think things ought to be done is far more difficult for a superstar than a journeyman because of their perspective.

Long story short (too late, I know), is that I think Fletcher is a unique combo of superstar and journeyman who could successfully make the transition, but I have a 25% reservation about his going the way of other highly talented superstar players that have a hard time understanding how someone can't do things the way they did it.


Singletary might not have been the best head coach out there but the dude is a great position coach. I could definitely see London being a stellar linebacker coach.
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Postby Hooligan » Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:16 am

TimSkin wrote:
emoses14 wrote:My only concern for Fletch as a coach would be the superstar problem. Whether fletch is a hall of famer or not, i don't think there is a lot of debate about whether he was/is an extremely talented singularly focused bad bad man on the field. Often throughout history, we've seen that it is the also ran journeymen (not a disparaging comment, but think like Reed Doughty) that make the best coaches when their playing days are over. Typically, I think people wrongly associate this with the fact that journeymen have to be "smart" or "truly understand the game" in a way that a superstar doesn't in order to succeed. And it is that quality that makes them a decent coach. The superstar, this theory goes, is so talented that they rely on their talent and don't fully appreciate the nuances of the game.

My theory on why Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary did not and why a guy like Fletch MIGHT not, is that the superstar isn't a bad coach because they don't understand the game, it is that they in fact clearly do understand the game on a level that most other can't, AND that is the problem. Trying to teach someone who is not as talented gifted driven as you are the way you think things ought to be done is far more difficult for a superstar than a journeyman because of their perspective.

Long story short (too late, I know), is that I think Fletcher is a unique combo of superstar and journeyman who could successfully make the transition, but I have a 25% reservation about his going the way of other highly talented superstar players that have a hard time understanding how someone can't do things the way they did it.


Singletary might not have been the best head coach out there but the dude is a great position coach. I could definitely see London being a stellar linebacker coach.


It's been said (can't remember where) that good coaches were players who succeeded with less innate talent and genetic ability than the other players around them... they had to work twice as hard as everyone else to reach that level of success. Fletcher was a 5'10" undrafted linebacker. He succeeded through heart, brains, and work ethic. Perfect match, I think.
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