Merriweather Deserves A Suspension

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Postby Kilmer72 » Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:01 pm

Merriweather has a history, a la Mark Carrier. He will be called from now on in questionable situations. He will probably be done after this season just like Mark unless he can show quickly he has changed. Here is hoping for the best. HTTR

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Postby ACW » Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:43 pm

riggofan wrote:
ACW wrote:How to hit cleanly:
Image
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhgDhAg9x-E


You're right! Shoulder first, middle of the body. I'm a little surprised this didn't draw the "defenseless receiver" flag though. Did it???
I was a few seasons ago, so that rule might not have been in effect then (isn't that rule just for head shots anyway?). Either way, that's how you hit. Shoulder to midsection. Clean, explosive, ideal.
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Postby ACW » Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:46 pm

Here's another one:
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Postby BigRedskinDaddy » Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:46 pm

I would like to ask everyone in this thread who wants Merriwether gone a question:

incendiary comments aside, how is he supposed to man his position in the new NFL? Hit WRs high it's likely targeting. Arrive just when the ball does it might be a defenseless receiver flag. Depending on that play's leverage and technique, just having your off-hand within inches of the WR's jersey is PI 99 times out of a 100.

What's left? Tackling low, around the knees. Midsection if possible, but these guys are too elusive to be taken down using the old wrap up and drive through approach. I mean c'mon, seriously - the league has darn near pulled every last one of a defender's teeth...
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Postby grampi » Tue Oct 29, 2013 7:40 am

I think the league has gone too far in trying to protect players...it's a rough game and if you don't want to risk getting hurt, don't play...it's as simple as that and the league should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to players during the game...the players know the risk going in, therefore the league should be relieved of any responsibilities for injuries...

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Postby StorminMormon86 » Tue Oct 29, 2013 7:43 am

He really shouldn't have made the comments about ending people's careers, that makes him look even more like a dirty player. He could have simply said he has to adjust his game and hit people to avoid penalties. Simple as that.

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Postby emoses14 » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:59 am

grampi wrote:I think the league has gone too far in trying to protect players...it's a rough game and if you don't want to risk getting hurt, don't play...it's as simple as that and the league should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to players during the game...the players know the risk going in, therefore the league should be relieved of any responsibilities for injuries...


I actually agree that they've gone too far. For me, though, it is because they are looking in the wrong place. I do not think it is the receivers and dbs that are the real problem with respect to concussions or cte. I think the majority of that issue lies with the linemen, then linebackers and running backs. I think the focus needs to be on better helmet design to counter balance the repeated blunt force trauma those players are getting every damn play. Not on the highlight "knockout" hit that gets ooohs and aaaahs.

However, I disagree that the league should be exempt from liability solely because the players "chose" to play football. Much like I don't believe coal miners who worked prior to the introduction of proper breathing protection (if that even exists now) should be told "tough luck, you chose to work down there" when they got black lung. Even with an assumption of risk, there is protection against extraordinary danger. Players aren't suing the league for torn knees, jacked fingers, bad backs, etc. Not to mention, I'm fairly certain the league is not interested in admitting that the risk of head injury on the magnitude it has manifested was understood risk on their and the players' part because I believe that would open the league up to even more litigation for past injuries.
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Postby DarthMonk » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:04 am

Meriweather calls out Marshall; says 'you've got to tear people's ACLs'
By Ryan Wilson | CBSSports.com
October 28, 2013 1:08 pm ET

Back in Week 7, Redskins safety Brandon Meriweather was flagged twice for illegal hits to the head of Bears' receivers Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery. Afterwards, Marshall, one of the NFL's most physically imposing wide receivers, said Meriweather "needs to get suspended or taken out of the game completely."
Well, the league suspended Meriweather two games without pay for repeated violations to the NFL's safety rules prohibiting hits to the head, which was later reduced to one game for reasons that still remain unclear.

On Monday, Meriweather, fresh off suspension, was asked about Marshall's comments.

"He feel like I need to be kicked out of the league? I feel like people who beat their girlfriends should be kicked out too," he said, via the Washington Times' Zac Boyer.

Meriweather was referring to a 2007 incident in which Marshall was arrested on domestic violence charges against his then-girlfriend. (Those charges were dropped.) The girlfriend later filed a civil suit against Marshall, which was dismissed last September.

"You tell me who you'd rather have," Meriweather continued, "Somebody who play aggressive on the field, or somebody who beat up their girlfriend?"

Meriweather also shared his thoughts on his tackling style, which has landed him in plenty of trouble with the league during his career.

“The NFL had to do what they have to do, you know?” he said. “I guess they felt like suspending me for a game was the right thing to do to make an example – that they don't tolerate aggressive plays.

“To be honest, man, you've just got to go low now, man. You've got to end people's careers, you know? You've got to tear people's ACLs and mess up people's knees now. You can't hit them high no more. You've just got to go low.”

Meriweather could have chosen his words more carefully but his point remains: The forever-shrinking area defenders are allowed to target means that knee injuries will be an unintended consequence of aggressively enforcing penalties for head shots.

Still, those comments won't go over well at NFL headquarters. Days after the league reduces Meriweather's suspension, he proclaims that ending careers and blowing out ACLs is his most prudent course. Hey, at least he's not head-hunting!

To recap: In addition to last week's suspension, Meriweather was fined $42,000 earlier this season for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Packers running back Eddie Lacy. In 2011, his only year with the Bears, he was fined $20,000 for a helmet-to-helmet hit and another $25,000 for unnecessary roughness. In 2010 with the Patriots, Meriweather was fined $50,000 (later reduced to $40,000) for a vicious hit on then-Ravens tight end Todd Heap.

For a league that preaches safety, it sure has a funny way of punishing its frequent offenders.
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Postby Irn-Bru » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:53 am

emoses14 wrote:
grampi wrote:I think the league has gone too far in trying to protect players...it's a rough game and if you don't want to risk getting hurt, don't play...it's as simple as that and the league should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to players during the game...the players know the risk going in, therefore the league should be relieved of any responsibilities for injuries...


I actually agree that they've gone too far. For me, though, it is because they are looking in the wrong place. I do not think it is the receivers and dbs that are the real problem with respect to concussions or cte. I think the majority of that issue lies with the linemen, then linebackers and running backs. I think the focus needs to be on better helmet design to counter balance the repeated blunt force trauma those players are getting every damn play. Not on the highlight "knockout" hit that gets ooohs and aaaahs.


The better equipment reduces injuries given the way players play, but it also "trains" them to play in ways that are far more dangerous. It's something of a vicious cycle. Since a concussion is caused by your brain hitting your skull, and not your (unprotected) skull hitting something else, there is no protection that will ever be able to stop that from happening. Design the best helmet in the world, and still a sudden force will cause a brain bruise.

My opinion is that the best way to enhance player safety is to look at more fundamental rule changes than what we've seen. Specifically, I think the NFL should borrow its tackling rules from rugby, which are much better designed and better protect player safety. The basic rules are: you have to wrap up or at least attempt to wrap up, you can't launch yourself like a missile, and you can't body slam a player. No need for the extra qualifications, because the rules (and, honestly, the lack of equipment) mean that players are coached to tackle properly. Outside of the illegal hits, if you tackle recklessly or with bad form, you're more likely to injure yourself than the person you are tackling.
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Postby SkinsJock » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:44 am

Grant Paulsen, 106.7 The Fan, Sports Reporter

Mike Shanahan on Brandon Meriweather: "Brandon knows that he's got to hit above the knees and below the neck, or he's not going to be playing in the NFL."
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Postby riggofan » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:45 am

StorminMormon86 wrote:He really shouldn't have made the comments about ending people's careers, that makes him look even more like a dirty player. He could have simply said he has to adjust his game and hit people to avoid penalties. Simple as that.


I agree. I know the point he was trying to make, but it came across like, "Fine, I'll just tear up some knees if you're not going to let me hit dudes in the head."

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Postby SkinsJock » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:56 am

Irn-Bru wrote:
emoses14 wrote:
grampi wrote:I think the league has gone too far in trying to protect players...it's a rough game and if you don't want to risk getting hurt, don't play...it's as simple as that and the league should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to players during the game...the players know the risk going in, therefore the league should be relieved of any responsibilities for injuries...

I actually agree that they've gone too far. For me, though, it is because they are looking in the wrong place. I do not think it is the receivers and dbs that are the real problem with respect to concussions or cte. I think the majority of that issue lies with the linemen, then linebackers and running backs. I think the focus needs to be on better helmet design to counter balance the repeated blunt force trauma those players are getting every damn play. Not on the highlight "knockout" hit that gets ooohs and aaaahs.

The better equipment reduces injuries given the way players play, but it also "trains" them to play in ways that are far more dangerous. It's something of a vicious cycle. Since a concussion is caused by your brain hitting your skull, and not your (unprotected) skull hitting something else, there is no protection that will ever be able to stop that from happening. Design the best helmet in the world, and still a sudden force will cause a brain bruise.

My opinion is that the best way to enhance player safety is to look at more fundamental rule changes than what we've seen. Specifically, I think the NFL should borrow its tackling rules from rugby, which are much better designed and better protect player safety.
The basic rugby rules of tackling are:

you have to wrap up or at least attempt to wrap up

you cannot launch yourself like a missile (leave your feet)

you cannot body slam a player.

No need for the extra qualifications, because the rules (and the lack of equipment, like helmets) mean that players are coached to tackle properly.

Outside of the illegal hits, if you tackle recklessly or with bad form in rugby, you're more likely to injure yourself than the person you are tackling.


+1 - with some 'clarifications' :wink:

helmets are needed for protection in the NFL but they should not be used as a 'weapon'
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Postby Irn-Bru » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:02 am

Agreed, SkinsJock. I'm definitely not suggesting that the NFL drop helmets or even shoulder pads.

My rugby rules weren't precise but I didn't mean for them to be. The "body slam" rule is shorthand for the laws about not lifting a player above horizontal without ensuring he goes safely to the ground, not driving him into the ground, etc. Just trying to keep it simple. ;)
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Re:

Postby markshark84 » Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:39 pm

Irn-Bru wrote:
emoses14 wrote:
grampi wrote:I think the league has gone too far in trying to protect players...it's a rough game and if you don't want to risk getting hurt, don't play...it's as simple as that and the league should not be held responsible for injuries that occur to players during the game...the players know the risk going in, therefore the league should be relieved of any responsibilities for injuries...


I actually agree that they've gone too far. For me, though, it is because they are looking in the wrong place. I do not think it is the receivers and dbs that are the real problem with respect to concussions or cte. I think the majority of that issue lies with the linemen, then linebackers and running backs. I think the focus needs to be on better helmet design to counter balance the repeated blunt force trauma those players are getting every damn play. Not on the highlight "knockout" hit that gets ooohs and aaaahs.


The better equipment reduces injuries given the way players play, but it also "trains" them to play in ways that are far more dangerous. It's something of a vicious cycle. Since a concussion is caused by your brain hitting your skull, and not your (unprotected) skull hitting something else, there is no protection that will ever be able to stop that from happening. Design the best helmet in the world, and still a sudden force will cause a brain bruise.

My opinion is that the best way to enhance player safety is to look at more fundamental rule changes than what we've seen. Specifically, I think the NFL should borrow its tackling rules from rugby, which are much better designed and better protect player safety. The basic rules are: you have to wrap up or at least attempt to wrap up, you can't launch yourself like a missile, and you can't body slam a player. No need for the extra qualifications, because the rules (and, honestly, the lack of equipment) mean that players are coached to tackle properly. Outside of the illegal hits, if you tackle recklessly or with bad form, you're more likely to injure yourself than the person you are tackling.


Agree with all of this. As far as the rugby comment --- I have been saying something similar to my friends. In rugby you can't leave your feet, have to wrap up, and there is a penalty for high tackles (although the high tackles are generally from tackling at the neck). Most DBs don't even wrap up --- they just throw their body into the player.
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Re:

Postby riggofan » Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:56 pm

Irn-Bru wrote:My opinion is that the best way to enhance player safety is to look at more fundamental rule changes than what we've seen. Specifically, I think the NFL should borrow its tackling rules from rugby, which are much better designed and better protect player safety. The basic rules are: you have to wrap up or at least attempt to wrap up, you can't launch yourself like a missile, and you can't body slam a player. No need for the extra qualifications, because the rules (and, honestly, the lack of equipment) mean that players are coached to tackle properly. Outside of the illegal hits, if you tackle recklessly or with bad form, you're more likely to injure yourself than the person you are tackling.


That's really interesting about rugby and the tackling rules. I'm not that familiar with it, but you're totally right about the way players in the NFL frequently HIT rather than TACKLE. Does the lack of helmets and pads make them more likely to tackle than hit?

The crazy sizes in the NFL have to play into this a little bit as well. Some of the DBs have to tackle guys who outweigh them by 30 or 40 lbs. Eddie Lacy v. Merriweather for example.

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